Elementary

November 9th, 2011

Rumpelstiltskin

Posted by sasha in Uncategorized

I did three columns, raging from Giving, to Equal Exchange, to Taking in the story. I think it’s highly subjective, though. For example, I placed, “Manikin splits self in two” under “Giving” since I consider his death giving the Queen a new life, but I know not everyone would agree with me.

Also, the lines in the columns are related to each other depending on their order in the columns, just as if this chart were lined up across…Though that’s subjective as well, especially since I didn’t have to rearrange many of the lines from the original ordered line-up. I don’t think this worked out too well.

Giving
Manikin trades necklace for spun gold
Manikin trades ring for spun gold
Manikin splits self in two

In the middle
King rejoices
King marries daughter
Manikin makes new promise about guessing name
Daughter/Queen gives birth
Queen incorrectly guesses names
Queen sends messenger out to find names
Manikin rejoices by fire, dancing

Taking
Miller lies to King about daughter
Daughter put in room with task
Manikin returns for promised child
Manikin trades child for spun gold
Queen learns true name

Repetition is what gives this myth it’s structure. The manikin comes to save the girl again and again, until the climax of the story where he wants her to find out his name. The repetition “grows” and that’s where we get our “structure,” as Levi-Strauss says, “The function of repetition is to render the structure of the myth apparent.” The repetition is what moves the story along, and this way the story moves along is what we call it’s structure.

Print Friendly


One Response to ' Rumpelstiltskin '

Subscribe to comments with RSS or TrackBack to ' Rumpelstiltskin '.

  1.    Kevin L. Ferguson said,

    on November 12th, 2011 at 1:37 am

    I was going to ask about your placement of “Manikin splits self in two”–you’re absolutely right that it kind of depends on a reader’s point of view to decide how to categorize that event. I, for instance, always feel bad for the manikin, who basically lives up to his end of the bargain numerous times, shows compassion in giving her a second chance, and then is cheated and led to suicide!

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.

Spam prevention powered by Akismet

Skip to toolbar